Introducing Owen

I think all young writers began telling their stories in first-person point of view.

I did, fifty years ago. I wrote many of my stories at school, but I did it at a different level than my classmates by making myself a character in my stories. A few teachers suggested I replace “me, Steve Campbell, the I character” with a narrator that had a different name to prevent confusing my readers. So, I reluctantly created Owen Burkhart to be my narrator.

Actually, I already had a character named Owen Burkhart. He was a 9-year-old boy who lived across the street from an old woman whom he thought was a witch. I had written his story (not very well) in third-person point of view, so I changed it to first-person and he became my new narrator.

He went through a few more name changes over the years, but he was always Vree’s confidant. His story has always been about her, which is why I want to tell her story from his viewpoint.

Owen—ages 9, 15, 21, and 27 (Digital artwork)

You may recognize the faces above as those of actor Zachary Gordon. He was in the Diary of a Wimpy Kid movie (2010) and its two sequels Rodrick Rules (2011) and Dog Days (2012). I used Gordon’s face in 2012 as a model for Owen (aka Lenny then) since he looks like how I envisioned Owen all those years ago.

The four ages represent times of important events in Owen’s life. And each event involves Vree.

I have not decided on how to show these four events. One idea I have is to present them as acts in a book. Another idea is to write a stand-alone book for each age, making the books a set of four in a series. In either case, Owen meets Vree eighteen years ago when they are 9 years old and experience something fantastic that greatly affects and changes their lives.

Their story begins with a mystery.

Vree is interested in photography, so she snaps a photo of her new, remodeled home with her new digital camera. Owen watches her from his front yard. She seems bewildered, so he goes to her. She shows him the digital image and thinks something is wrong with her camera. The image shows the house, sky, and parts of the property washed out of their color. Owen takes a picture of the house and the same thing happens. Vree is convinced her camera is damaged until Owen photographs her and then his house. Those pictures look fine.

Something is wrong with the house!

Vree’s photo compared to how the house, sky, and yard look to the naked eye

Owen tells her that a witch used to live in the house until she died. (See my last post, “Searching for Gems in Backstory.”) This sets in motion the idea that Vree lives in a haunted house. Her parents cannot explain the odd photos other than either mechanical or battery failure caused it, and they promise her that the last owner was not a witch and the house is not haunted.

Feeling alone, she turns to Owen. And so begins their friendship through the thick and thin phenomena of my favorite subject to write about: Fantasy, with many of its sub-genres, including magic, the paranormal, and the supernatural at its forefront.

Published by

Steve Campbell

I am an artist and indie-author. I draw and paint wildlife art, draw cartoons, and write paranormal fantasy fiction.

2 thoughts on “Introducing Owen

    1. It’s difficult keeping the fire alive, but I continue slogging toward the finish line of my next novel. 😊

      Liked by 1 person

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